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Understanding the Social and Structural Drivers of Food and Nutrition Insecurity

Thu September 29th: 11:00 am-12:00 pm EDT

Free

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Boxes of canned food at a Food Bank

About This Webinar:

Emerging research has shown that many military families and veterans struggle to put food on the table and experience difficulty making ends meet. This issue is particularly important since food and nutrition insecurity adversely impacts family health and well-being and contributes to poor social and economic outcomes at the individual, household, and societal level. Moreover, studies indicate that Black, Indigenous, and people of color are disproportionately at risk for insecurity.

This discussion will highlight the social and structural determinants of food and nutrition insecurity and examine strategies and approaches for improving food access and equity in military families as well as all families.

Presenter

Picture of the presenter

Dr. Angela Odoms-Young

Associate Professor
Division of Nutritional Sciences
College of Human Ecology
Cornell University, Ithica

https://www.human.cornell.edu/people/amo2

Biography:

Angela Odoms-Young, Ph.D. (she/her/hers) is an Associate Professor and Director of the Food and Nutrition Education in Communities Program (FNEC) and New York State Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). In 2021 she joined the Cornell faculty after spending 13 years at the University of Illinois at Chicago in the Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition.

Dr. Odoms-Young’s research explores the social and structural determinants of dietary behaviors and related health outcomes in low-income populations and Black, Indigenous, and people of color. Her work also centers on developing culturally responsive programs and policies that promote health equity, food justice, and community resilience.

 

Continuing Education (CE) Credit

1.0 CPEU from the Commission on Dietetic Registration for RDNs and NDTRs pending approval.

Event Materials

Photo Credit: “Food” by U.S. Department of Agriculture, Flikr (CC BY 2.0)