Family Development

Journal Articles for Mental Health

We invite you to take a look at our list of journal articles. We have provided articles on the topic of mental health and how it effects and connects to the unique needs and situations of military children, couples, and families. Each title is linked to a webpage that has more information on how to obtain this literature. Feel free to contact us if you have others to recommend so we can add to our growing list.

Mental Health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012). 10 Leading Causes of Death by Age Group, United States—2010.
For the year 2013, the CDC discusses and illustrates the: a) 10 Leading Causes of Death by Age Group, United States; b) National Estimates of the 10 Leading Causes of Nonfatal Injuries Treated in Hospital Emergency Departments; c) National Estimates of the 10 Leading Causes of Nonfatal Injuries Treated in Hospital Emergency Departments; d) 10 Leading Causes of Injury Deaths by Age Group Highlighting Unintentional Injury Deaths; e) 10 Leading Causes of Injury Deaths by Age Group Highlighting Unintentional Injury Deaths.

Fischer, H. (2010). U.S. military casualty statistics: Operation New Dawn, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation Enduring Freedom
This report presents difficult-to-find statistics regarding U.S. military casualties in Operation New Dawn (OND), Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF, Afghanistan), including those concerning post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), amputations, evacuations, and the demographics of casualties. Some of these statistics are publicly available at the Department of Defense’s (DOD’s) website, while others have been obtained through contact with experts at DOD.

Kime, P. (Sept. 3, 2013). Hagel: Getting mental health help shows ‘courage, honor, and integrity.’ Military Times.
At the outset of Suicide Prevention Awareness month, the Pentagon wants service members experiencing a crisis to make a call. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Tuesday that seeking mental health treatment is a “choice that embodies moral courage, honor, and integrity” and recommended those who need help call the Military Crisis Line, 800-273-8255, anytime.

Melvin, K. C., Gross, D., Hayat, M. J., Jennings, B. M., & Campbell, J. C. (2012). Couple functioning and post‐traumatic stress symptoms in US army couples: The role of resilience. Research in Nursing & Health, 35(2), 164-177.
The purpose of this study was to investigate combat-related post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and couple relationships in Army couples. US Army combat veteran couples (N = 66 couples) completed self-report questionnaires on couple functioning, coercion, resilience, and PTSS. In 23% of the couples (n = 15), both members had PTSS above the clinical cut-off for suspected Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Higher levels of PTSS were associated with lower couple functioning and resilience. Individuals with high resilience scores reported higher couple functioning scores, regardless of PTSS (p = .004). Future researchers should focus on the role of resilience in relation to couple functioning, and ways to amplify resilience in military couples.